homeschool debate | Forums Wiki

HomeSchoolDebate

Speech and Debate Resources and Community
Forums      Wiki
It is currently Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:35 pm
Not a member? Guests can only see part of the forums. To see the whole thing (and add your voice!), just register a free account by following these steps.

All times are UTC+01:00




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 7:38 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:46 pm
Posts: 39
Home Schooled: Yes
How should LDers talk about prerequisites? Does it depend on the side of the resolution you're on? Would it be appropriate for the affirmative to say that privacy is paramount because other human rights need to exist before privacy can? Could the negative argue that national security is paramount because it secures the fundamental human rights? :?:

_________________
Emma Florez | Reg10n X | William Wilberforce Communicators

2012-2013 Speech only
2013-2014 Florez/Ketcham
2014-2015 Lincoln-Douglas
2015-2016 Lincoln-Douglas


“When in doubt, go to the library.”
― J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 10:39 pm 
Offline
Is now cool
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 26, 2009 9:29 pm
Posts: 3495
Home Schooled: Yes
Theoretically, yes, though those arguments don't tend to be the strongest. When the other side refutes, the argument becomes less persuasive and more chicken-and-egg.

The best values are the ones that are intrinsically valuable. For example, instead of the broad argument that national security leads to "other good things" and "other fundamental values," a better argument would be that national security leads to domestic tranquility/peace, which are inherently valuable (as long as you accept that war is not ideal.) Or instead of arguing that privacy is good because "achieving privacy means that you've already achieved a bunch of other stuff," you could make your point stronger by instead arguing that privacy is inherently valuable, or that privacy necessarily protects Human Dignity.

It's a much stronger rhetorical point to pick something specific, inherently valuable, and definitively tied to your side of the motion. "A vote for the negative is a vote against human dignity" will always be a stronger argument than "you should value privacy because general rights are needed to make privacy come about, so valuing privacy means you support that other good stuff by default too." See what I mean? :)


Top
   
PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 11:28 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:46 pm
Posts: 39
Home Schooled: Yes
+X wrote:
Theoretically, yes, though those arguments don't tend to be the strongest. When the other side refutes, the argument becomes less persuasive and more chicken-and-egg.

The best values are the ones that are intrinsically valuable. For example, instead of the broad argument that national security leads to "other good things" and "other fundamental values," a better argument would be that national security leads to domestic tranquility/peace, which are inherently valuable (as long as you accept that war is not ideal.) Or instead of arguing that privacy is good because "achieving privacy means that you've already achieved a bunch of other stuff," you could make your point stronger by instead arguing that privacy is inherently valuable, or that privacy necessarily protects Human Dignity.

It's a much stronger rhetorical point to pick something specific, inherently valuable, and definitively tied to your side of the motion. "A vote for the negative is a vote against human dignity" will always be a stronger argument than "you should value privacy because general rights are needed to make privacy come about, so valuing privacy means you support that other good stuff by default too." See what I mean? :)


Cool! I never really thought of all these arguments being so similar! Thank you, I'll keep this in mind. " :)

_________________
Emma Florez | Reg10n X | William Wilberforce Communicators

2012-2013 Speech only
2013-2014 Florez/Ketcham
2014-2015 Lincoln-Douglas
2015-2016 Lincoln-Douglas


“When in doubt, go to the library.”
― J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 

All times are UTC+01:00


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited